• FAQ
  • Young People
  • Parents
  • Teachers
  • Programmes
  • Glossary

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

What is wearedotdotdot?

wearedotdotdot is an online platform to connect young people to opportunities to learn digital skills and training opportunities that can help you get a job. The platform is a directory - you can search for the opportunities which help you learn specific skills, you can search by postcode and find out what things are happening in your area, or you can browse and see what you can find. wearedotdotdot is not a learning programme. We don’t run any programmes ourselves, we just help you find others that do.


Why is the site only for East London?

We think it’s most important to find opportunities local to you. So wearedotdotdot covers opportunities in East London at this point. It’s a local resource for young people who live in Hackney, Islington, Tower Hamlets and Newham - or those who can travel to these areas. There are also some online courses and kits that you can order online that you can access from anywhere.


Do you have plans to provide information on programmes in other areas?

Yes. We are exploring some new areas and would like to expand in the future. For the moment, the site will just cover East London.


How is the platform linked to Tech City?

Tech City is the name for the cluster of digital businesses based in East London, based mostly around Old Street roundabout. Many of the companies there are looking for good people - with the right skills - to help their companies grow. There are many opportunities in the Tech City area. We want to help young people who live locally to Tech City to access those opportunities.


Do I have to create an account to use this site?

No, but it helps if you do. You can browse the site without logging in. But, if you want to save your favourites, add a programme or contribute something to programmes, you need to log in at the top right hand corner of the site. You also need to log in to receive information from us - such as our newsletter or updates if courses in your area of interest are added. For more information about why we need this information and how we will use it, see our Privacy Policy.

Can  I remove courses from “My Favourite”?

Yes. Simply click on the favourites star, and the course will no longer appear as a favourite.


How do I unsubscribe from newsletters?

You can click the “unsubscribe” button on promotional email communications. Note that you are not permitted to unsubscribe or opt-out of non-promotional messages regarding your account, such as account verification, password requests, change or updates to features of the Platform, or technical and security notices.


Can I access wearedotdotdot on a smartphone or Tablet?

Yes, it should work on all devices. Let us know if you have problems with that.>


Can I sign in to the platform using my social login?

Yes, you can sign in using Facebook, G+, Twitter as well as email. Be aware that if you login using a social media account that platform might have access to information about how you use our platform. Check our privacy policy for more info, and check your settings with the account that you are using to log in with.


How do I apply to be a Digital Learning Programme?

To register as a Digital Learning Programme and post your opportunities onto the site, first you have to log in. Once you have done that, go to the ‘submit’ page and read the guidance. If you agree with the guidance and you meet the criteria, select ‘agree’ and you will be taken into a form where you can upload your information. We will then need to verify that you are real organisation and the courses, events or products are digital learning opportunities. Once we have verified you, if you have a completed profile, we will add you to the platform.

*If you are working with young people under 18 you should be aware of the UK Government’s Guidance on safeguarding children and young people. wearedotdotdot does not enforce this, but we do advise parents, teachers and young people to ask you about your child protection policy before attending a course in person. They may choose not to attend your course unless you can provide them with your policy. See the guidance from government here

What are your Terms and Conditions for Digital Learning Programmes?

Our Terms and Conditions are quite simple. We ask you to agree you are a real organisation, providing real opportunities for young people to learn digital skills. We also ask you to provide a regular contact person and their contact details. And we ask you to keep your information up to date.


How do I contribute?

If you would like to support any of the Digital Learning Programmes you can do so in the ‘Contribute’ area. This gives you a list of 10 different things you can do. Once you’ve identified what you would like to offer, the platform will show you a list of Programmes looking for this kind of support. You can choose from here which Programmes you would like to support and wearedotdotdot will connect you.


How do I report a bug?

Before submitting a bug report, please read our basic Troubleshooting Guide below. If those tips don't help resolve the issue, email us at wearedotdotdotHQ@gmail.com. Thank you for taking the time to help us improve wearedotdotdot


Troubleshooting Guide

There are a number of things you can try if you are having trouble loading or viewing wearedotdotdot.

  1. Reload the web page: This takes care of a majority of problems.
  2. Check your Internet connection We recommend that you have a reasonably fast connection to the internet. Any broadband connection, like DSL or cable, should be sufficient. If you are at work or school or using a shared wireless network, there may be a firewall or proxy that is interfering with your connection to wearedotdotdot. You will need to check this with the person responsible for your network.
  3. Check your web browser.

wearedotdotdot works best on an up-to-date browser. We recommend Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox. Trying a different browser is a good troubleshooting strategy.
Check that all of your plugins are up-to-date too. Chrome, Firefox and Safari users can use this site to check the status of their plugins. You don't need to have Flash installed to use wearedotdotdot.

  1. Check your browser's extensions. Some extensions, like ad blockers and pop-up blockers, can affect your activities on wearedotdotdot. Try disabling them one at a time. Once you find out which one is interfering, then you may be able to configure it to ignore wearedotdotdot.
  2. Clear your browser's cache and reload the web page. Instructions for clearing your cache: Chrome /Firefox
  3. Check your zoom level. If you have zoomed in or out on your browser, then you may see glitches. To get back to 100%, press Ctrl+0 (PC) or Cmd+0 (Mac).

Tried all that and still not working? Report a bug by contacting us at wearedotdotdotHQ@gmail.com

Young People

Guidance for Young People

Here are some tips about how to use this platform, how to enjoy learning digital skills and how to keep yourself safe.

1. What the platform is for - this platform is an online directory of opportunities to learn digital skills in your area. We publish information about local opportunities, and allow Digital Learning Programmes to submit their information. You can find profiles of organisations, courses and events. There are a wide range of programmes. They cover different subjects and work with young people of different ages.

2. How we decide which programmes are on the platform - when programmes apply we verify that they are a real. They need to have a contact person, phone number and to be offering digital learning. If they do that, we post them to the platform. We do not judge the quality of their programmes, so it is up to you to ask good questions to help you decide whether to go to events and courses.

3. Going to events and courses - check the programme is appropriate before you go on a course or event. Is it for your age group? Is it at the right level for you? Does it sound like you'll enjoy being part of the group? If there is a fee, are you happy to pay it? You can find more information by clicking through to the programme’s website, or by phoning or emailing the contact person.

4. Check that you will be safe - we are not responsible for your safety when you go to events or courses that are promoted on this platform. We do not check, for example, whether programmes have DBS approved trainers. DBS is the government’s Disclosure and Barring Service. This checks whether people have a criminal record or not. It is a good idea to ask programmes if they have DBS approved trainers before you go. If they don’t, it doesn’t necessarily mean the programme is a bad one, but you might be at more risk than a programme that does. You might want to ask a parent or adult to come with you, or to help you decide. 

5. How to be safe online - this platform includes information on online courses, as well as in-person programmes. Its important to know how to be safe online - things like choosing safe screen names and passwords, protecting your data and knowing how to remove photos if you don’t want them online any longer. Here are some useful links to top 10 e-safety tips, staying safe on social networks, online and mobile safety and an internet safety video.

6. Know your i-rights - we subscribe to the i-rights campaign which is calls for the internet to be developed and designed with young people in mind. We believe young people should be empowered to access the digital world creatively, knowledgeably and fearlessly. The five i-rights are the right to remove, the right to know, the right to safety and support, the right to make informed and conscious choices, and the right to digital literacy. Find out more about i-rights here -
http://irights.uk

7. Web literacy - the nice people at Mozilla Foundation have developed a guide to web literacy. These are all the things you want to know to be competent on the web. See here for all you need to know about exploring, building and connecting on the web. 

8. A Guide to Tech Roles, Skills and Languages - if you're wondering about jobs in tech and digital, here's a good guide on different roles and the skills you need to do them. 

9. Open Badges - you can use all kinds of different badges to recognise the skills you learn through many of the programmes on wearedotdotdot. Check out more about it here

Parents

Guidance for Teachers

This platform brings together information on local opportunities for young people to learn digital skills and find work opportunities. It covers some activities that take place in school, and some outside.

Here are some tips on how to use the platform.

What the platform is for - this platform is an online directory of opportunities that can help you engage young people in digital learning, and of activities you can connect young people to. We publish information about local opportunities*, and invite Digital Learning Programmes to submit their information. You can find profiles of organisations, courses and events. There are a wide range of programmes. They cover different subjects and work with young people of different ages. They include activities which are about digital creativity, learning and opportunities that connect to the world of work, like apprenticeship schemes.

What teachers can access through the platform - programmes that you can bring into school or college to help you develop digital technology skills. For example, programmes that are run in school which can help you deliver parts of the curriculum. These will usually be run by specialists, and often by people who work in the industry. You can search by age group, skill level and type of skill and also see which parts of the curriculum programmes address.

Networks as well as learning - you can also help young people connect to opportunities outside of school. There are many clubs, events and festivals to engage with locally, and we know that often it is teachers who can signpost these. You can encourage keen young people to use the platform themselves to find opportunities that appeal to them. Many of these programmes link to job opportunities and schemes like apprenticeship programmes that can help young people find work in the digital world.

In-person, kit and online - most of the programmes that feature on the platform take place in person - at clubs, meet-ups, hackdays or on training programmes. We also feature some programmes who teach using kit. You can buy these kits online and use them in the classroom. We also feature a small number of online learning programmes. There are many online resources and the ones featured here are a small selection. We have chosen the ones we think are good additions to learning digital skills in person.

Attending local events and courses - we provide information about these programmes, but we are not responsible for them. We verify that the organisations are in operation and ask for contact details and contact person. We do not vouch for the quality of the programmes, and only rank them by users on the site showing their favourites. You must decide which are most appropriate for your school and to refer young people to. More information can be found on the websites of each programme which you can link through to from our platform.

Safeguarding Young People - young people can be at risk both at in person events and courses, and online. We do not approve programmes on basis of child safety criteria. We don’t, for example, insist programmes confirm they are run by DBS checked adults in order to appear on the platform, but we do advise programmes to have a child protection policy in place. It is a good idea to ask this when connecting a young person to a course or event for the first time.

How to Code in School - the Computing Curriculum has introduced a wave of coding into schools across the country. See here for more on how schools are tackling the new curriculum. You are most likely familiar with these resources, but if not, there is a lot more guidance, through organisations like TES and CAS and others. This platform is not intended as a teaching resource, but simply to connect you - and young people - to the programmes you can engage with locally, outside the formal education system. We think some of these programmes are particularly well placed to support teachers, to help you deliver parts of the curriculum, and to engage with industry.

What Digital Learning Programmes provide - It’s great that Computing is on the curriculum, but it’s not the only way to learning. Coding - and other technology skills - is a creative and collaborative skill. Here’s an article on the US perspective as to how the Learn-to-Code movement augments teaching in schools and helps young people connect.

Careers in Digital - there is a growing demand for young people with the right digital skills. This is particularly true for your local area, where there is an active tech cluster. Through the right kind of training programme, young people can access jobs with starting salaries of £25-30k. You can help young people into these kinds of jobs by helping them engage with the learning opportunities on this platform. There is good guidance for young people on digital careers here.

*In this beta phase of the platform, local opportunities means East London, in the boroughs of Hackney, Islington, Newham and Tower Hamlets.

Teachers

Guidance for Parents

How to find local digital learning opportunities for your child, how computing is being taught in schools and more about careers in the digital world. 

There are many opportunities locally for jobs in the digital field. Learning digital skills, both in and out of school, is important for young people - not only for work, but also for life.


Here are some tips on how to use the platform, and on opportunities for young people in the world of digital.


  1. What the platform is for - this platform is an online directory of opportunities to learn digital skills in your area. We publish information about local opportunities, and invite Digital Learning Programmes to submit their information. You can find profiles of organisations, courses and events. There are a wide range of programmes. They cover different subjects and work with young people of different ages.

  2. What young people can access through the platform - courses and events that young people can attend, and details about organisations running them. These range from programmes that are run in school, to after-school clubs, to events in the community, to apprenticeship schemes and training programmes. They include programmes for young aged 6-25.

  3. In-person, kit and online - most of the programmes that feature on the platform take place in person - at clubs, meet-ups, hackdays or on training programmes. We also feature some programmes who sell products. Parents often buy these kits to explore digital learning with their children at home. We also feature a small number of online learning programmes. There are many online resources and the ones featured here are a small selection. We have chosen the ones we think are good additions to engaging with digital making in person.

  4. Attending local events and courses - we provide information about these programmes, but we are not responsible for them. We verify that the organisations are in operation and ask for contact details and contact person. We do not vouch for the quality of the programmes, or rank them according to any criteria, apart from what users favourite. You must decide which are most appropriate for your children. More information can be found the websites of each programme which you can link through to from our platform.

  5. Safeguarding Young People - young people can be at risk both at in person events and courses, and online. We do not approve programmes on the basis of child safety criteria. We don’t, for example, insist programmes confirm they are run by DBS checked adults in order to appear on the platform. It is a good idea to ask this when your child is attending courses or events for the first time. You can do that by contacting the organisation through email or phone before attending. It is also a good idea to help your child understand internet safety issues. Here is a good guide for parents. Or check out the Guidance for Young People on this site.

  6. How Computing is being taught in schools - Since September 2014 the Computing Curriculum has been taught at primary and secondary schools in the UK. See here for the detail of the curriculum. Our belief is that the informal learning programmes on this platform are great ways of augmenting what children are learning at school. Often, the people running these programmes are more expert at the technology they are teaching because they work in digital jobs. They can also help young people connect with a network of people working in the field.

  7. Careers in Digital - there is a growing demand for young people with the right digital skills. This is particularly true for your local area, where there is an active tech cluster. Through the right kind of training programme, young people can access jobs with starting salaries of £25-30k. You can help your child into these kinds of jobs by helping them engage with the learning opportunities on this platform. There is good guidance for young people on digital careers here.

    8. Enjoy it - engaging with digital is fun! Help your child find a programme or activity they enjoy. They will learn so much faster. 

Programmes

Guidance for Programmes

wearedotdotdot is an online directory of digital learning programmes. It promotes courses, events and products that engage young people* in digital learning face-to-face**, online or through products.


*6-25
**Currently in beta, opportunities in East London only.

The purpose of the platform is to scale up the number of young people in East London accessing digital learning and into-work opportunities.

There are plans to expand the platform to include other locations, but for the moment we are concentrating on activities that take place in the boroughs of Islington, Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham.

To appear on this platform you must be an organisation with a base in these boroughs, or running courses and events in at least one of these boroughs, or an online course or product that augments in-person digital learning.

Here is some guidance on how to submit your programme to the platform, and on the criteria you need to fulfill.

  1. Criteria - your organisation is based in the boroughs of Islington, Hackney, Tower Hamlets or Newham, or you run events and/or courses in these boroughs, or you have an online course or product which supports digital learning or making.

  2. Activity - your programme teaches digital skills or you offer into-work opportunities for people who want to work in the digital sector. (By that we mean internships, traineeships, work placements or apprenticeship programmes.)

  3. Apply - you can submit your information in 3 different ways. 1. Create a profile for your organisation which explains what you do, who you are and how to connect with what you offer. This is mandatory - you must have a profile to add any further information such as events or courses. 2. Add an event. You can add an event or series of events that take place in East London (Islington, Hackney, Tower Hamlets or Newham). This is not mandatory but you must have a profile in order to do add an event, and the event must be linked to your profile. 3. Add a course. You can add a course or any number of courses that take place in East London (Islington, Hackney, Tower Hamlets or Newham). This is not mandatory but you must have a profile in order to do add a course.

  4. Time commitment - nominate a dedicated person to keep your information up to date. We will archive events and courses which have passed, but other than that, it is up to you to look after your information. Who will do that? How often are they available? Do they have the time? It's not a big commitment but you do need to have someone in place who can monitor and update your profile.

  5. Make your information user friendly and interesting - we advise using high quality images of your work, and adding a profile picture for your key contact person to make your programme appear accessible and welcoming. 

  6. Support for your programme - we invite partners to use the site to see how they can support local digital learning. Consider what kind of support would help your programme grow. Who would you like partners to contact if they have an offer?

  7. Make your information appealing - the platform invites users to favourite the programmes, courses and events they like the most. If you want to submit a profile, look at how others appear, and pick some images which will help you present your information well.

  8. Child protection - if you are offering events or courses for young people under 18 we expect you to have all the necessary child protection procedures in place. It is not our job to enforce this, but we advise that you have adequate protection in place, including the required DBS registered adults at events and courses.

  9. Make sure own your information and images - before you submit any images, make sure you know where they come from. If you don't own those images or videos then it is illegal for you to put them on the site. You'll need to have the consent of anyone featured in those images or videos.

  10. Keeping information up to date - we will check to ensure the information on the platform is up-to-date. We reserve the right to take down your profile and course and event entries if they are in the past, or if you have been inactive on the site for a considerable period of time.

  11. Publicity - we would like to make the information on the site as appealing and relevant as possible. You can contact us specifically if you have a particular event or offer that you would like us to publicise.

  12. Welcome - assuming you meet the criteria above, welcome to the platform and we look forward to having you on board.

Glossary

Glossary

Access

Microsoft Access, often abbreviated "MS Access," is a popular database application for Windows. Access allows users to create custom databases that store information in an organized structure.

Advertising

Online Advertising is a form of advertising which uses the internet to deliver promotional marketing messages to consumers.

Also known as Online Marketing or Internet Advertising.

Algorithm

An algorithm is a set of instructions, sometimes called a procedure or a function, that is used to perform a certain task. This can be a simple process, such as adding two numbers together, or a complex function, such as adding effects to an image.

Analytics

Web Analytics is the process of analysing the behavior of visitors to a Web site. The use of Web analytics is said to enable a business to attract more visitors, retain or attract new customers for goods or services, or to increase the dollar volume each customer spends.

Android

Android is Google's mobile operating system (OS) that is used by several smartphones, such as the G1, Droid, and Nexus One. Android is open source, meaning it is not linked to a specific cell phone manufacturer or service provider. The Android OS also supports third-party applications, which can be downloaded from Android Market, Google's online software store.

Antivirus

Antivirus (also written "anti-virus" or simply "AV") is software designed to prevent, detect, and remove viruses from a computer. Once installed, most antivirus programs run in the background, scanning new files for viruses and performing regular system checks. You can also use an antivirus utility to scan individual files or folders directly.

API

Stands for "Application Program Interface," or "Application Programming Interface." An API is a set of commands, functions, and protocols which programmers can use when building software for a specific operating system. The API allows programmers to use predefined functions to interact with the operating system, instead of writing them from scratch.

Apple

Apple is the company that makes Macintosh computers, such as the iMac, Mac mini, MacBook, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and Mac Pro. Apple also makes several personal electronic devices, including the iPod, iPhone, and iPad.

App

App is an abbreviated form of the word “Application”. An application, or application program, is a software program that runs on your computer. Web browsers, e-mail programs, word processors, games, and utilities are all applications. The word "application" is used because each program has a specific application for the user.


A mobile app is a software application developed specifically for use on small, wireless computing devices, such as smartphones and tablets, rather than desktop or laptop computers.

Beta Software

Before a commercial software program is released to the public, it usually goes through a "beta" phase. During this stage, the software is tested for bugs, crashes, errors, inconsistencies, and any other problems.

C

C is a high-level programming language that was developed in the mid-1970s. It was originally used for writing Unix programs, but is now used to write applications for nearly every available platform. Compared to most previous languages, C is easier to read, more flexible (can be used for a wide variety of purposes), and more efficient at using memory.

C++

C++, pronounced "C plus plus," is a programming language that was built off the C language. The syntax of C++ is nearly identical to C, but it has object-oriented features, which allow the programmer to create objects within the code. This makes programming easier, more efficient, and some would even say, more fun. Because of the power and flexibility of the language, most software programs today are written in C++.

Coding

The symbolic arrangement of statements or instructions in a computer program in which letters, digits, etc. are represented as binary numbers.

CSS

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) are used to define the look and feel of a web site outside of the actual HTML of the site. In recent years, CSS has replaced tables and other HTML-based methods for formatting and laying out websites. The benefits to using CSS are many, but some of the most important are the simplification of a site’s HTML files, which can actually increase search engine rankings and the ability to completely change the style of a site by changing just one file without having to make changes to content.

Cyber Security

Cyber security is the body of technologies, processes and practices designed to protect networks, computers, programs and data from attack, damage or unauthorized access. In a computing context, the term security implies cybersecurity.

Data



Digital Learning Programme

Data is distinct pieces of information, usually formatted in a special way. All software is divided into two general categories:data and programs. Programs are collections of instructions for manipulating data.


Digital Learning Programmes are organisations providing opportunities for young people to learn digital skills and access jobs. This includes everything from programmes working with schools and colleges, to out-of-school clubs, courses and events. It covers professional bootcamps and coding drop-ins, meet-ups, networking events and internships, work placements and apprenticeship schemes.

End User

An end user is the person that a software program or hardware device is designed for. The term is based on the idea that the "end goal" of a software or hardware product is to be useful to the consumer. The end user can be contrasted with the developers or programmers of the product. End users are also in a separate group from the installers or administrators of the product.

HTML

Stands for "Hyper-Text Markup Language." This is the language that Web pages are written in. Also known as hypertext documents, Web pages must conform to the rules of HTML in order to be displayed correctly in a Web browser. The HTML syntax is based on a list of tags that describe the page's format and what is displayed on the Web page.

iOS

iOS is Apple's mobile operating system that runs on the iPhone, iPad, and the iPod touch. It has a graphical user interface (GUI) that is optimized for touchscreen devices.

Java

While most of the world uses "Java" as another term for coffee, the computer science world uses it to refer to a programming language . The syntax of Java is much like that of C/C++, but it is object-oriented and structured around "classes" instead of functions. Java can also be used for programming applets -- small programs that can be embedded in Web sites. The language is becoming increasingly popular among both Web and software developers since it is efficient and easy-to-use.

JavaScript

Like Java, this is a programming language designed by Sun Microsystems, in conjunction with Netscape, that can be integrated into standard HTML pages. While JavaScript is based on the Java syntax, it is a scripting language, and therefore cannot be used to create stand-alone programs. Instead, it is used mainly to create dynamic, interactive Web pages. For example, Web developers can use JavaScript to validate form input and create image rollovers.

Mac OS

This is the operating system that runs on Macintosh computers. It is pronounced, "mack-oh-es." The Mac OS has been around since the first Macintosh was introduced in 1984. Since then, it has been continually updated and many new features have been added to it. Each major OS release is signified by a new number (i.e. Mac OS 8, Mac OS 9).

Marketing

Refers to advertising and marketing efforts that use the Web and email to drive direct sales via electronic commerce, in addition to sales leads from websites or emails. Also known as Online Advertising or Internet Marketing.

MySQL

MySQL, pronounced either "My S-Q-L" or "My Sequel," is an open source relational database management system. It is based on the structure query language (SQL), which is used for adding, removing, and modifying information in the database. Standard SQL commands, such as ADD, DROP, INSERT, and UPDATE can be used with MySQL.

MySQL can be used for a variety of applications, but is most commonly found on Web servers. A website that uses MySQL may include Web pages that access information from a database. These pages are often referred to as "dynamic," meaning the content of each page is generated from a database as the page loads. Websites that use dynamic Web pages are often referred to as database-driven websites.

Native app

Native apps are installed through an application store (such as Google Play or Apple's App Store). They are developed specifically for one platform, and can take full advantage of all the device features. They can use the camera, the GPS, the accelerometer, the compass, the list of contacts, and so on.

Native code

Also referred to as native language, programming code that is written to run on a specific processor using that processor’s instruction set. In order for that program to run on a different processor than the one intended by the native code, the code must be run through an emulator software program that instructs the computer to mimic the processor the native code is meant for.

Objective orientated programming

A type of programming in which programmers define not only the data type of a data structure, but also the types of operations (functions) that can be applied to the data structure. In this way, the data structure becomes an object that includes both data and functions. In addition, programmers can create relationships between one object and another. For example, objects can inherit characteristics from other objects.

Operating Software

Also known as an "OS," this is the software that communicates with computer hardware on the most basic level. Without an operating system, no software programs can run. The OS is what allocates memory, processes tasks, accesses disks and peripherals, and serves as the user interface.

PHP

Self-referentially short for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor, an open source, server-side, HTML embedded scripting language used to create dynamic Web pages.

Platform

In the computer world, a "platform" typically refers to a computer's operating system. For example, a Dell computer running Windows XP would be considered to be running on a Windows platform. An iMac, on the other hand, runs on the Macintosh platform. It is a more generic way of referring to a computer's operating system than having to specify.

Product Development

Product development is the process of designing, creating and marketing new products or services to benefit customers. Sometimes referred to as new product development, the discipline is focused on developing systematic methods for guiding all the processes involved in getting a new product to market.

Programming

Creating an organized list of instructions that, when executed, causes the computer to behave in a predetermined manner. Without programs, computers are useless.

Python

Python is a programming language commonly used for creating Web applications and software plug-ins. It is designed to be highly readable with an uncluttered visual appearance. Python is similar to other scripting languages like Perl and PHP, but uses English words more frequently and has less punctuation. Programs written in Python can be saved as basic scripts (with a .PY file extension) or compiled programs (with a .PYC extension).

RTF

Stands for "Rich Text Format." RTF is a file format standardized by Microsoft for creating formatted text files. Unlike a basic text file, an RTF file can include information such as text style, size, and color. The nice thing about the RTF format is that it is a universal format, meaning it can be read by nearly all word processors.

Ruby

An object-oriented programming language. Ruby On Rails is used to develop database backed web applications.

Social Networking

When the Web became popular in the mid-1990s, it enabled people to share information in ways that were never possible before. But as limitless as the possibilities seemed, there was a personal aspect that was lacking. While users could create home pages and post their own content on the Web, these individual sites lacked a sense of community. In the early 2000s, the Web became much more personal as social networking websites were introduced and embraced by the masses.


Social networking websites allow users to be part of a virtual community.

Software

Computer software is a general term that describes computer programs. Related terms such as software programs, applications, scripts, and instruction sets all fall under the category of computer software. Therefore, installing new programs or applications on your computer is synonymous with installing new software on your computer.

Software can be difficult to describe because it is "virtual," or not physical like computer hardware. Instead, software consists of lines of code written by computer programmers that have been compiled into a computer program. Software programs are stored as binary data that is copied to a computer's hard drive, when it is installed. Since software is virtual and does not take up any physical space, it is much easier (and often cheaper) to upgrade than computer hardware.

Software engineering

The computer science discipline concerned with developing large applications. Software engineering covers not only the technical aspects of building software systems, but also management issues, such as directing programming teams, scheduling, and budgeting.

Source Code

Every computer program is written in a programming language. These programs include anywhere from a few lines to millions of lines of text, called source code.

Source code, often referred to as simply the "source" of a program, contains variable declarations, instructions, functions, loops, and other statements that tell the program how to function.

SQL

Stands for "Structured Query Language," and can be pronounced as either "sequel" or "S-Q-L." It is a query language used for accessing and modifying information in a database. Some common SQL commands include "insert," "update," and "delete." The language was first created by IBM in 1975 and was called SEQUEL for "Structured English Query Language." Since then, it has undergone a number of changes, many coming from Oracle products.

Today, SQL is commonly used for Web database development and management. Though SQL is now considered to be a standard language, there are still a number of variations of it, such as mSQL and mySQL. By using a scripting language like PHP, SQL commands can be executed when a Web page loads. This makes it possible to create dynamic Web pages that can display different information each time they load.

Static Website

A static website contains Web pages coded in HTML. The content of each page is fixed and does not change unless it is edited and republished by the webmaster. Static websites are usually small and only contain a few brochure-style Web pages.

User experience

The overall experience of a person using a product such as a website or computer application, especially in terms of how easy or pleasing it is to use.

User Interface

A user interface is the means in which a user controls a software program or hardware device. For example, a software interface may include windows, icons, menus, and buttons that allow the user to interact with the program. This is also known as a graphical user interface, or GUI.

Website

A website, or Web site, is not the same thing as a Web page. Though the two terms are often used interchangeably, they should not be. So what's the difference? To put it simply, a Web site is a collection of Web pages. For example, Amazon.com is a Web site, but there are millions of Web pages that make up the site.